Star Gazing. A guide for the beginner

Since the dawn of humanities existence on earth people have looked at the stars. They have sued them for knowledge, predictions, solace and navigation. With Conservatories Gloucester or in the Highlands or in Wales you can sometimes rely on a low light pollution that will allow you to see the stars clearly. Try this map to see where the best spots are. An conservatory can really help the experience by providing you with cover so why not have a look at this website for some examples https://www.firmfix.co.uk/conservatories/.

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You don’t need much to star gaze, essentially you just wait for a clear night and look up. However, that’s just missing out on a whole host of fun things that you can do and learn about these celestial bodies.

  • Get a Telescope. You’ll be able to see things a lot clearly and close up. Though you won’t have the ability to see Alpha Centauri or Sirius the Dog star up close, but it will appear brighter than it ever has been to you before. You can see the plants though and it really is something to see the “canals” of Mars or Venus’s cold beauty with the naked eye as opposed to on the television. The quality of the telescope is linked to the amount that you’re willing to pay I’m afraid but there are some decent starter kits for kids and yourself which also comes with a guide as to where the stars are and where to find them.
  • Get a star map. If you can’t find a particular star or constellation that your looking for then the best thing to do is get a start map. Some of the best ones are in a circle that you can rotate it around occurring to the phases of the moon. That way you can reinstate your view to see what you’re looking for. It’s a very good idea to get a map and guide because there are an awful lot of stars to look at! There are Apps that you can download giving you the chance to look at them whenever the sky is clear enough for you to do so.
  • Take note of the weather. If it’s cloudy then you’re not going to see very much at all! Before you stargaze make sure that it’s going to be a clear night. It’s also a good idea to check the phases of the moon as a full moon is the ideal time to look.
  • Get a map of the moon. It’s the brightest thing in the night sky and if we get a super moon where it appears really close its nice to be able to pick out the many “seas” and craters on the side we can see.

It’s quite a rewarding hobby and can be done anytime of the year, as long as the sky is clear Winter can provide the best times but wrap up warm!

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